machine knitting midgauge standard bulky machknit knit machine-knit patterns

Monday, May 21, 2012

The Windmill Bag -- a hand knit converted to machine knit



A friend recently asked if she could share a pattern that I had converted from hand to machine knit.  Since it was originally Danielle La Framboise's pattern, I didn't have any rights to it and also wanted to give Danielle due credit.  With those things said, I think it's ok to post my mk version.  Then I also realized I had never posted anything about doing this bag, so here it is.

If you would like to see the 500+ projects made from Danielle's pattern, go to :

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/windmill-bag

I'm pretty sure you have to be a member of Ravelry to view, but if you're not, it's free and easy to join .


Windmill bag --  converted from hk to mk

Machine: Midgauge or bulky machine, no ribber required so it can be made on any machine, really. Sample was knit on a SR 860 midgauge; multiply approx 1.7 the stitches and rows to make it on a standard gauge. Directions are for the midgauge and the bulky machine will produce a slightly larger bag.
Yarn: I used Gjestal 100% wool, 50 gr = 100 meters (approx. sport wt), 2 skeins pink, 2 skeins red, one skein white (Schuss Plus, Dale of Norway Heilo are all similar)
      Gauge: not important, but I used T10. for best felting
Finished size: Mine, sitting flat turned out to be 18” tall x 12” wide.  Yours may vary from this.
Notes: This is a very easy knit, suitable for beginners. Can use any design pattern for the strips or knit it plain. The hand knit version is garter stitch, the mk version is stockinette. I did the knit and attach- as- you- go method so that there would be no seaming to do. The HK version attaches the I cord ties at the end of each strip, which would be just as easy to do. I did them last. The original is cotton, not felted. Lining is optional.

Body of the bag.
Strip1: Ewrap cast on 30 stitches, knit 120 rows, bind off.

Strip 2, 3 and 4: RC 000. With purl side facing you, pick up and hang 30 stitches along the bottom right side of rectangle 1. Knit 2 rows. *Pick up a whole stitch from strip 1 and hang onto the leftmost needle of your new strip. Knit 2 rows.* Continue from * to * until all stitches are hung from that side of strip 1. Continue to RC 120, bind off around the gate pegs. Strips will be uneven.
Continue adding strips until you have all 4 knit and attached to each other.
      Here's a view of the bottom of the bag.

I cord tie straps and attached I cord trim.

Hope the picture is more helpful than confusing.  Start out by making one tie strap. Ewrap cast on 4 stitches. Set machine to slip one way/ knit the other to make cord. RC 000. Knit 180 rows (actually 90 knit rows). Do not remove from machine. Pick a point of one of the purse points, with knit side facing you, *Hang one whole stitch on left most needle. Knit 2 rows I cord.* Continue around the V picking up every purse stich and knitting the two I cord rows. When you get to the top of the next purse point, stop attaching and Knit 180 rows of I cord. Bind off. For the next V, cast on for the I cord and knit 2 rows. Begin attaching at the top of the next V just under the previous I cord and attach the new I cord in the same manner making a tie strap at the end of the opposite side of the V. Continue around the purse until you have 4 ties and all edges have the I cord trim.

      Finishing

Sew in all yarn ends. Secure tightly the trim that meets a tie strap so that when felted it looks continuous. The purse has a funny shape , but it will take a better shape once felted. Put in the washing machine hot/cold with some jeans and a small amt of detergent. Do one or more cycles until the stitches are felted to your satisfaction. I dried mine upside down on an empty, large (2 gal) laundry soap bottle that I just happened to not have recycled yet. The
rectangular bottom fit the bottom of the purse exactly. Optional: Once dry, put a stiff plastic rectangle at the bottom of the purse to hold its shape. If you don’t like the look of the plastic, you could knit or sew a cover/sleeve for it. Tie the straps however you wish.


Several members of my mk guild made one of these and it was fun to see the "variations on a theme".  It's also gratifying to know that you made the bag in a fraction of the time it would take to knit by hand.   All that I cord by hand?  Blech.   Once again....yea machine knitting!

7 comments:

rett og vrang said...

WoW! What an idea for MK! Is it possible for me to try this one, too? Hugs, Synnøve from Norway

Mar said...

Of course you should try it. It is harder to describe than to knit!

Helen Fox said...

This bag amazing must give this one a go

Helen Fox said...

An amazing bag must give it a go sometime

Helen Fox said...

This is such a clever bag. I must have a go soon

Linda Jensen said...

I knit this in Paton's Classic Wool and it went fine until the last panel. I got lost on how to connect the final "L". I was connecting the panel on the left side, but how did you connect the panel on the right side to complete the closure of the windmill? Did you do it by hand?

Mar said...

Hi Linda,
It's been a while since I knit this. Had to think about it. If I remember correctly I did all the panels with the same sew as you go method, including attaching the 4th the the first as the 4th was being knit. However, there's no reason why you couldn't hand sew it if you can't get your mind around it. Felting is very forgiving and the last seam should look pretty much like the first if you don't do it too tightly.
Mar